Tag Archives: News

Expectations

handshake-2056023_1920

Can we talk for a moment about unrealistic expectations?

Whenever I do a simple job search, I find a laundry list of expectations: the degrees and certifications you should have, the years of experience you need to have, the very specific talents and abilities you absolutely must have.

Many of the job postings I read are the size of a novel, and for entry level positions! Who are they looking to hire — God? It certainly seems like it.

Yes, my complaints can certainly be spun as the quibbling of a ne’er-do-well, or the incessant whining of an unemployed “millennial” who is now crying and imploring the government for assistance. But I am neither of those types. I can’t accurately identify myself as a “type.” I’m not sure anyone should.

While I am definitely not saying that I am qualified to be a doctor, or a software engineer, or even a social media manager, I am genuinely wondering is whether we, as a society, have overemphasized the so-called requirements for being even remotely considered, and forgotten that many people can, in fact, be trained and taught (and oftentimes are) to learn on the job. What happened to people training as an apprentice or assistant with no experience whatsoever?

Jobs like those do exist. But they are few and far between. And we are increasingly forced to have to do curriculum vitae acrobatics and empty our wallets to gain more certifications, degrees, and licenses.

Don’t even get me started on the push for higher education and the racket that college has become. I say this, naturally, having already spent two years in the college system, and I return in the fall of 2017 to finish my half empty degree. But more on that later.

What are your thoughts?

Advertisements

Hiatus

photo

I return to Machshevot after a months-long hiatus which came about after an unexpected sequence of events.  One of these unexpected events was my sudden migration from Israel, the country of my soul, to America, the land of my heart, which despite its many flaws still never fails to mesmerize me.

This post will not be a tirade against the media – though granted, the mass media always deserves some lambasting. This will be a very brief discussion on why I left Israel, meant for those readers, however few in number they may be, who are curious about my decision to leave Eretz Yisrael, which still is and always will be a place I call home.

Let me start by referencing an interesting article which was released some months back, around the time my husband and I decided to move back to the United States, titled “Sure you can make it in Israel – if your parents help, say economists.” Unfortunately this article presents a truth which hits too close to home. Although my reasons for leaving Israel were primarily familial in nature, the economic opportunities or lack thereof proved to be a significant hindrance to a normal work-life. Living in an urbanized area in Israel, which is a must if you do not own a car, is equivalent to living in some of the most expensive metropolises in the world. Yet the wages are disproportionately low and work, in general, is hard to come by unless you are in certain specific fields (technology, science, etc.).

Nevertheless, my motivation for leaving depended on one fact which would most likely never change: the distance from family. At approximately 5,900 miles from my parents on the East Coast and approximately 7,400 miles from my husband’s parents on the West Coast, there was little to no plausibility of frequent visits and vacations on either of our parts. And, as it does for most normal folk, finances naturally play a role in it. Who can afford several round trip tickets between Israel and the United States, even only once per year?! The sacrifice of leaving Israel was monumental, but the imminent sacrifice of time with loved ones was far greater.

That said, I will deeply cherish the time I spent in Jerusalem and the Holy Land. The experience I gained there will stay with me forever, and I pray to see it once again soon.

“If I forget you, Jerusalem, may my right hand forget its skill.” (Psalm 137:5)